Every wine is different. The same wine can taste different just hours apart from each sip – this is probably the greatest characteristic about this drink. With soda or beer, one knows what they will taste. The mystery behind every bottle of wine makes it so special.

As science has progressed so has the chemistry of viticulture. With the ability to separate yeast strains, winemaking can now be controlled to get a desirable outcome.No matter how fancy or expensive the bottle, every wine is compromised of mostly water and alcohol – only 2 percent of the chemical composition allows for any variety. But oh, how that 2 percent can vary.

Last week I went to a restaurant in Sorrento, Italy and tried these two different wines. The one on the left was a 2013 Chianti red ($5/glass) and the one to the right was the house red wine ($8/liter). Although I know nothing about the origin of the house wine on the right, I could tell it was a young wine, most likely from 2015. It was not the sweetest of wines. It did have a high acidity which means the alcohol content was lower; this was also represented in the slow viscosity from the tears on the side of the wine glass. Acidity in wine is the taste of tart and zesty. The glass on the left had a dark body, rich and complex. It had a low acidity and was sweet. It also had a bitter and dry aftertaste. This is due to tannins that dry out your tongue.

Each wine had its pro’s and con’s. The red wine to the left was complex and sweet but had a very bitter and dry aftertaste. The wine to the right was very acidic but also fruity. However, my favorite was the one to the left since it had a greater complexion and was lest acidic which is what I like in a wine.